Can't Find What You're Looking For?

Loading...

Tuesday, 3 May 2016

Landmark Hotel Expands to River's Edge

The Atholl Arms Hotel, Gerry's Kitchen

The Atholl Arms Hotel, one of Dunkeld’s landmark buildings, has expanded its operations right down to the banks of the River Tay.

The 17 bedroom hotel, where Queen Victoria dined as a princess, has opened a new Garden Terrace which provides glorious views up to Thomas Telford’s famous five arched bridge, opened to the public a quarter-of-a-century before the Atholl Arms was built in 1833.

Local architect Robin Baker designed the oak framed pavilion with surrounding stone walls and slate roofing. Construction work was carried out by H and H Construction. From the pavilion guests can be served meals, snacks, tea, coffee, alcohol and soft drinks.

“By carefully consulting planning authorities on all the details a wonderful setting has been created that not only provides a great place for a relaxing cup of coffee or glass of wine but great panoramic views of the River Tay and the historic bridge,” said Neil Sinclair who owns the Atholl Arms Hotel with his wife Christine. “Guests can now view the bridge from a perfect location which matches the riverside setting.”

Railings have a nautical design element. Stone copings have been transformed from slab shelving found in the hotel’s basement and previously used to store fish, meat and game in the days before refrigeration.

“The Garden Terrace adds an exciting new dimension to the Atholl’s hospitality offering, and makes the most of our location near the river,” Mr Sinclair added.

 

 

Saturday, 30 April 2016

Balmoral & Eriska Top Bill for Scottish Catering Awards

Edinburgh’s iconic Balmoral and the Isle of Eriska are each in the running for a double helping of success at this year’s Catering Scotland (CIS) Excellence Awards after being shortlisted for both Hotel and Restaurant of the Year.
The Balmoral, whose landmark clock next to Waverley station is set three minutes fast to help ensure passengers don’t miss their train, is named as a finalist in the Group Hotel category. Eriska, located at Loch Creran in West Argyll, is a finalist in the Independent Hotel section.
Number One at the 168-bedroom Balmoral, which has retained its Michelin Star for 13 consecutive years, and Eriska’s restaurant, where the wine list runs to 40 pages, are bracketed with Neil Forbes’ Cafe St Honore in Edinburgh for Restaurant of the Year.
The Balmoral, part of the Rocco Forte Group, also boasts a third and fourth finalist in patisserie chef Ross Sneddon and Young Chef of the Year contender Mikaela Wright.
Another Edinburgh hotel, the George, is a finalist in both the Restaurant Newcomer and Banqueting and Events Chef categories. Its Printing Press restaurant faces competition from as far apart as Aberdeen and the Scottish Borders.
The junior chef category was introduced this year as part of an industry drive to attract more young people into the sector. It was open to chefs under 25 working at any professional level in Scottish hospitality.
Caterer Entier is shortlisted no fewer than four times, for Chef of the Year; Banqueting and Events Chef; Training and Employee Retention; and the Healthier Scotland Award.
The Awards’ advisory board includes Andrew Fairlie of the eponymous restaurant at Gleneagles Hotel, Wendy Barrie of the Scottish Food Guide, Hospitality Industry Trust (HIT) Scotland chief executive David Cochrane, Stephen Carter MBE, and James Thomson OBE, owner of Edinburgh’s Prestonfield Hotel.
Judges’ Chairman Neil Thomson commented: “Once again the Awards Board have been very impressed not only with the number of nominations across all categories but also their high quality. This is testament to the commitment of everyone working in the hospitality industry in Scotland. “
As the Scotland’s annual competition combining the catering, hospitality and tourism industries, the CIS Excellence Awards are seen as the ultimate accolade for hotels, restaurants, gastro pubs, chefs and other organisations north of the Border.
The presentation ceremony, which will take place at the Hilton Glasgow on Thursday 26th May, will be hosted for the first time by broadcasters Catriona Shearer and Grant Stott.

Friday, 29 April 2016

Review - The Mumbai Mansion, Morrison St, Edinburgh


Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurants
When we go out for dinner, we almost never go to an Indian restaurant. It's not that we don't enjoy Indian food, in fact we both love it but tend to get takeaway if Indian cuisine is on our radar, but when we were invited to try out The Mumbai Mansion in Edinbugh, we jumped at the chance to make a trip through to the capital.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsThe restaurant, situated just a stones throw from Edinburgh Haymarket train station, has been open since late 2015. Head chef Pramod Nawani is well known within the curry world having led Mithas to the Restaurant of the Year at the 2014 CIS Excellence Awards (the first time that an Indian restaurant claimed the top prize) Mithas is no longer open but Pramod, accompanied by Rawat Dev Singh who has worked on the Royal Caribbean Cruise Line and The Cinnamon Club, is continuing to wow Edinburgh diners with his unique twist on Indian cuisine.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsOur table was booked for 5:30pm on a cold Saturday evening and after wandering around the busy shops for what seemed like a lifetime, we made our way to the restaurant. When we arrived, we were the first people through the door and we were a little concerned that The Mumbai Mansion wasn't the most popular place to eat but it didn't take long for the restaurant to start to fill up and by the time we left, there weren't many empty tables.
The decor is dominated by the huge chandelier that hangs from the raised ceiling whilst the rest of the interior is decorated in a very modern way without being too clinical. Each of the glass topped dining tables covered a carved wooden map of India and each of its regions. I don't know a great deal about India and its food so would have been good to know which regions influence each of the dishes on the menu.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsThe wine list is extensive and well priced with the house wine coming in at a very reasonable £15.95 - we opted for a bottle of Lolo Albariño at £22.95
The wine was packed with peach and apricot aromas and a creamy almond finish on the taste that worked very well with the spicy food that was heading our way.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsIced tap water was provided without the need to ask. We loved that the water came in a branded Kilner style clip top bottle.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurants
The Mumbai Mansion do not deep fat fry anything which means that if your looking for pakora or a cheeky onion bhaji to start your meal, you'll go hungry. The restaurant philosophy is based on the fact that all fresh ingredients can be grilled which allows the chefs to use all their skills and experience to create a menu that The Mumbai Mansion believe will revolutionise the way that we think about Indian cooking.
That's said, once we cast our eyes over the starters menu, we weren't disappointed with the exclusion of pakora. We really struggled to choose our starters because everything sounded delicious but in the end, nicola ordered the Monkfish Tikka which was marinated in yogurt and green herbs before being finished off in the tandoor. What she got was three huge chunks of meaty monkfish that had been cooked to perfection and well spiced but not so much that the fish was lost in the mix. This was served with a fiery green chilli and herb dipping sauce that complimented the monkfish tikka.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsFor my own starter, I opted for the Scallops & Mussels which were tossed and served in a Nilghiri sauce. This was a fantastic dish. Two huge sweet scallops and a handful of meaty mussels were served in a sauce that was rich with fresh coriander and mint leaves. Again, the spicing in the sauce was just right allowing the delicate scallops to shine.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsWith our tastebuds now awake, we were ready for more and it wasn't long before our mains arrived. In addition to the dishes that we had ordered, Restaurant Manager Merwyn added a side of curried okra, reasoning that our main dishes didn't come with a huge amount of sauce. I've cooked with okra once before and it was a huge fail, the okra ending up sloppy and gloopy. This definitely wasn't the case here though as the okra still had a little bite while the rich onion and tomato sauce came with a fiery kick.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsOne reason that we don't eat Indian food often is that we both end up feeling really bagged up as we approach the end of a meal. With this in mind, Nicola chose the Tandoori King Prawns which had been marinated in the chefs secret blend of spices. These were the biggest prawns that we have seen in a UK restaurant. There were four of these mighty crustaceans and they were huge! They tasted great too with the spices working well with the meaty prawns. When accompanied with the pilau rice, heavily flavoured with saffron and cumin seeds, light and fluffy naan bread plus the okra side, Nicola had an Indian meal that she was more than happy with. One thing to bear in mind of you order the Tandoori Prawns, make sure to eat them quickly as the Prawns do tend to go a little rubbery once they start to cool down.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsI really struggled to choose a main dish but when under pressure from Nicola to pick something, I ordered the Sea Bass Masala. The main menu has so many dishes that sound fantastic but I was keen to see how the sweet delicate flavours of the sea bass would stand up against the spices. I had no need to worry though as my main dish was outstanding. The sauce had a depth of flavour that I loved. Sweet onion and acidic tomato were quickly replaced with a slow burn from the spices in the masala but once again, the main ingredient wasn't overpowered. I asked Merwyn how they managed to stop the sea bass flavour being overrun by the spices and he explained that the fish is marinated in spices and pan-fried before being tossed in the sauce just before serving.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsBy this point, we were both feeling pretty full but Merwyn insisted that we had ended our meal with a little pudding. The dessert menu has a selection of puds that you might find in any of the chain restaurants (sticky toffee pudding, cheesecake, etc), but the two that stood out were Mango Tasting and the Indian Trio.
The Indian Trio was a dessert that suited the sweet tooth in me. The rice pudding with a burnt sugar crust was sweet and creamy and oh so moreish, while the carrot halwa turned the sugary sweetness all the way up to eleven. Carrot halwa is traditionally served at India festivals, made from carrot, condensed milk and sugar. I'd never had halwa before but once I got used to the slightly unusual texture, I quite liked it although it was too sweet, even for me. The last part of the little trio was my favourite Indian dessert - Gulab Jamun, a sponge made from milk solids that is deep fried before being soaked in syrup. I know they're sweet and I know they're probably not good for you but Gulab Jamun are amazing and the little offering at The Mumbai Mansion was exactly I expected. I was suitably stuffed by the time that I had finished munching my way through the trio but I didn't mind . . . . It was worth it.
Nicola's Mango Tasting was a much lighter affair with three little puds that were the complete opposite to the heavy desserts that I had served to me. A sharp mango sorbet with fresh mango salad helped cleanse the palate before the creamy mango panna cotta reminded us that Indian desserts are very sweet. However the shot of blitzed mango with passion fruit purée and fresh mint was the perfect way to end a spicy meal and I'm slightly jealous that I didn't have this too!
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh restaurantsI mentioned earlier that The Mumbai Mansion hope to change people's perceptions of Indian food and based on the meal that we enjoyed, then they have managed to convince the two of us that Indian restaurants can do fine dining too. In fact, I'd go so far to say that this was one of the best Indian meals that we've had to date.
The Mumbai Mansion isn't the cheapest Indian restaurant out there but with the quality of food on display, they're not going to be cheap. If you are looking for somewhere to celebrate a special occasion or of you fancy a change from your usual curry house, then I would have no hesitation in recommended my The Mumbai Mansion.
We were guests of the restaurant but my review is an honest review of the food and service that we received on the night. I left a tip (because we had been given very good service across the evening) but Merwyn was insistent there was no need however I'm a big one for making sure that service is rewarded so stuck to my guns and made our way out into the night. Merwyn got the last laugh though because when myself and Nicola went next door to The Jolly Botanist (an award winning gin bar) for a drink for the road, he managed to get to the barmaid before me and paid for our drinks. Thanks Merwyn!
To book a table, call the restaurant on 0131 229 7173 or you can book online here.
Keep up to date with news and offers from The Mumbai Mansion on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Tuesday, 26 April 2016

Another honour for Taynuilt as young chef triumphs at hotel awards

Gerry's Kitchen, The Taynuilt Hotel & Restaurant, Scottish Hotel Awards, Ross Harris

The Taynuilt Hotel and Restaurant is celebrating again after its sous-chef was named the best in Scotland.

Ross Harris, 21, picked up the prize at the Scottish Hotel Awards in Edinburgh on Sunday night, a couple of weeks after the hotel won its second AA Rosette for culinary excellence.

Born and raised in Taynuilt, he worked on Saturdays at the baker’s shop in the village before going on to work as a kitchen porter at local hotels. After leaving school in 2013 he took up the role of commis chef role at the Taynuilt Hotel.

John McNulty, Chef-Patron of the Taynuilt Hotel and Restaurant, commented: “I’m very proud of Ross. After working so hard it’s good to see him getting national recognition. This latest award is an example of how seriously we take the training and development of our staff and underlines the strength of our kitchen team.”

Ross, who was also recently voted on to Taynuilt's Community Council as its secretary, said: "I’m ecstatic to have received this award. I’ve been working very closely with John to be where I am now and want to thank him very much for all his teachings."

Gerry's Kitchen, The Taynuilt Hotel & Restaurant, Scottish Hotel Awards, Ross Harris

 

Friday, 22 April 2016

5 Questions - Joo Won, Head Chef Galvin at Windows, Hilton Park Lane

5 Questions, Gerry's Kitchen, Joo Won, Galvin at Windows
Myself and Nicola have just arrived in London, ready to cheer on my brother-in-law as he runs the London Marathon this coming Sunday. Keen to make the most of our trip, we have arranged a couple of lunches at two of Jason Atherton's restaurants plus dinner reservations at two of Marcus Wareing's restaurants. The highlight of our trip will be our lunch booking at Galvin at Windows located on the 28th floor of London Hilton on Park Lane.
Opened in May 2006, Galvin at Windows has held one Michelin star since 2010. Chef Patron Chris Galvin and his team work tirelessly to create seasonally inspired menus based around modern French haute cuisine. Head chef Joo Won has been at the restaurant from day one and has worked his way through the ranks from Commis de Partie to lead his own team in the kitchen.
Here's Joo's story;

How did you get started?

I started my chef career when I was 26. I went to college to study industrial engineering, found out that it was not working out for me, so I joined the navy for two and half years as national service in Korea, where I occasionally helped my seniors to prepare the meals for team. After Navy, by my mother’s recommendation, I went to pastry institutes where I had great fun learning to make sweets, bread, pastry etc. What I most enjoying was feeling with all my sense! Nose, hands, eyes and taste… I could feel this through my whole body which I never felt while I was studying industrial engineering.

I Wanted to learn more about food in Europe, so I moved to the UK and settled until today.

My first job was at Glasgow, in a hotel restaurant in the city centre. Not long after working there, chef recommend me to go down to London to see more structured professional kitchen to accelerated my skills and knowledge. I got the job at my first Michellin star restaurant at the Orrery. It was very hard but I could see myself progressing, becoming more confident with improving skill & knowledge. I was really pleased to find myself working with a team that actually maked me push myself to become better. Then I realised that having a job as a chef is not just about cooking, it is about me doing what I am really into, even obsessed with, and can actually be good at something and I told myself, this is what I have to do for my life. For about the first three years of my chefs career, my life was just about cooking. Eat, buy books and work, don’t remember anything else I did apart from working. I moved to Galvin at Gindows as a CDP when the Galvin brothers opened the restaurant in 2006, since then I was here everyday till now.

What’s the best piece of business advice you could give?

Be sure to find potential within the team who actually run the place. We chefs are craftman, it needs discipline, time and sacrifice of some of your life to achieve something special. I call it quality ; not only for your product, but for yourself as well. It is my job and my main focus to develop & motivate the team to deliver that quality with their real heart and respect. That is the base of our good business plan. With that solid foundation, you know you have a confidence to attack. Respect & looking after your team is first on my list and will helping any business succeed.

Where would you like to see yourself in 5 years time?

I would say, it is more like focusing on consistency and standards as well as seeing a gradual growth of our restaurant & bar business. Galvin at Windows is one of not many restaurant that can handle high quality food with massive numbers & functions. It is like a well oiled machine that can run at a couple of hundred miles per hour and you can’t see when it is going to stop. It has been a hard and long jurney for us to get to this stage, we have been through really hard times in order to maintain our consistency of quality. We have continual training so that everyone can take ownership, care and have a level of knowledge required to be in control. Up to date, we have improved like never been seen before with a really strong team on front of house and in the kitchen. We understand how to become flexible to deliver quality, and know how to maintain it. It is all about organisation, planning and following up each other to make sure everyone is running at their best. We just need to carry on in this way without fail, and always be on the lookout for gaps for improvement.

If you could only have one of your own recipes, what would it be & why?

It is Korean marinated pork with fermented soy bean & chilli paste. It is definitely not a French dish but the recipe is very versatile that will work with any type of meat, fish and also complements really well with vegetables. We have used this a lot along with our basic French cooking method to give extra depth and flavour to the dish. Everyone loves it.

You can invite one person (living or dead) to your last meal – Who would it be and why? …and what’s on the menu?

That's a ery hard question. It would either be my wife or mother. I probably have to say it would be my mother. She is the person put me on the path of a chef's life which I enjoy with all my heart. I have been in London for about 16 years now and my mother has never has any issues about my job, choices and decisions about being a chef. She is probably the one pushing me to do more. I have no brothers and sisters and father passed away a while ago and since then my mother she was been always been alone but she has never said anything negative, just been as supportive as possible. My mum definitely needs to be with me at my last meal.

Although I am a chef, she doesn’t trust me how I want to cook. I would probably be better leaving the cooking to her and she would prepare a proper authentic Korean meal that I know I will enjoy.

5 Questions, Gerry's Kitchen, Joo Won, Galvin at Windows
It's no secret that life in a professional kitchen is hard work but Joo's story goes to show that if you love something and put the effort in, the rewards can be fantastic.
It's a busy time at Galvin at Windows just now as the team pull out all the stops to ensure that their 10th birthday celebrations go off with a bang so I would like to thank Joo for taking the time out to answer 5 Questions. I would also like to wish him and the rest of the staff at Galvin at Windows a very Happy Birthday and all the best for the future.

 

Wednesday, 20 April 2016

Edinburgh’s Harajuku Kitchen receives culinary accolade from the AA

Edinburgh’s most authentic Japanese restaurant, Harajuku Kitchen is celebrating today after being awarded a coveted AA Rosette for Culinary Excellence. Revered AA Inspectors award Rosettes to “the best restaurants serving food prepared with care, understanding and skill, using good quality ingredients. These restaurants will be achieving standards that standout in their local area… guests should be able to eat in with confidence and a sense of anticipation.”
Harajuku Kitchen specialises in authentic Japanese cuisine from small dishes, ideal for sharing, such as classics like Beef Tataki and Chicken Karaage to more unusual delicacies such as Salmon Nanban - fried salmon dipped in soy and vinegar glaze, sake, chilli, onion and carrots, Gomadare salad with seaweed, lettuce, glass noodles, sesame, miso dressing, cucumber, carrot and edamame or Takoyaki - dough balls with octopus and cabbage in katsu sauce. They also offer a range of noodle and Japanese curry dishes and a wide variety of freshly made sushi, sashimi and maki.
Harajuku Kitchen’s Chef Patron Kaori Simpson was born in Hong Kong and learned to cook in her mother’s restaurants after her great grandfather established one of the most famous fine dining restaurants in Japan: His guests hailed from political and business backgrounds enjoying the traditional food and geisha experience on offer. After moving to the UK Kaori continued her chef training, even working at Edinburgh’s Michelin starred The Kitchin, to gain experience in the European repertoire. She then decided to concentrate on Japanese cuisine and was appointed private chef to the Consulate General of Japan, in Edinburgh. Kaori’s entrepreneurial side was unleashed when she was given the opportunity to host a stall at the Stockbridge Market in Edinburgh. Together with her husband, Keith, they started with Japanese Gyoza dumplings and Udon noodle stir fry and from that went on to open Harajuku Kitchen, a Japanese bistro in Edinburgh’s Bruntsfield in 2013. And, even with an AA Rosette you can still occasionally find Kaori helping Keith out at the markets on the weekend.
Kaori has said “We are so delighted to receive this fantastic accolade from the AA. I’m so proud of my team for all the hard work and dedication they have put in to make it happen. We have just started to open now for lunchtime during the week – so they are working doubly hard and really deserve this superb accreditation.”
Opening times:
Monday - Friday
12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. / 5:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday - Sunday
12:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.
Catering / private functions available 24/7
10 Gillespie Place - Edinburgh
Tel : 0131 281 05 26
http://www.harajukukitchen.co.uk/
Twitter @Harajukukitchen

Review - Two Fat Ladies at the Buttery, Argyle Street, Glasgow

Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
Over the last year we have been lucky enough to eat some fantastic meals however one of the best meals in recent times also happened to be one of the least expensive too when we had lunch at Two Fat Ladies at the Buttery.
The original Two Fat Ladies opened in 1989 on Dumbarton Road in Glasgow's West End and the group has grown to four restaurants with The Buttery opening in 2007. I had heard so many great reviews about Two Fat Ladies but had never managed to find the time to get along to any of their venues. When I spotted that the website, Itison was selling a lunchtime deal which included three courses and a glass of champagne for two people at the discounted price of just £25, I didn't hesitate and snapped up the offer.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
We arrived a little late for our reservation thanks to me thinking that the restaurant was somewhere else but after a short taxi ride, we arrived safely and took a few minutes to catch our breathe with a lovely chilled glass of champagne. Two Fat Ladies has a very impressive wine list to suit all budgets plus a few wines recommended by the house. We ordered a very nice bottle of Albariño by Señorio de Rubios, priced at £30. Iced tap water was provided without having to ask.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
The lunch menu is normally priced at £16.95 for two courses or £19.95 for three courses which is a great deal when you consider that there are four choices for each course.
To start, Nicola went with the Home Hot Smoked Salmon, Potato & Red Onion and Quails Egg, which was delicious. The succulent salmon had a subtle smokiness that worked well with creaminess from the accompanying potato salad whilst the quails egg lifted this dish to another level.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
I had eyed up the salmon as my own starter but as I was having fish for my main, I decided to go with the Chicken Liver & Truffle Pâté, Melba Toast and Plum & Sultana Compote. The liver was smooth and silky, with just enough truffle flavour to cut through the rich liver flavour. The sharp compote was a great contrast to the richness of the pâté. If I had to critisice, I mouldy have preferred a little more melba toast for the decent slice of pâté although I'm sure that if I had asked, they would have been more than accommodating.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
For her main, Nicola ordered the Braised Pork Belly, Puy Lentils with spiced orange jus. This was a stunning plate of food. This was one of the best pieces of pork belly that we have tasted in a while. Crispy crackling on the outside with soft, melt in the mouth pork underneath. The Puy lentils were well flavoured, their earthiness working well with the sweet braised meat. Normally Nicola isn't a fan of fruit flavours being on her dinner plate but the spiced orange jus, rounded the dish off well.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
I nearly picked the pork too but the sound of the 'fish of the day' grabbed my attention. The Sea Bass fillets served on a bed of Lyonnaise style potatoes, with mustard & caper dressing as divine. The delicate flavours of the fish were in perfect harmony to the sharp and salty dressing while the stack of buttery potatoes added a little substance to the overall dish. I've had a lot of sea bass in my time and this was definitely one of the best.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
We were served a side dish of roasted vegetables and potatoes. All of the veg was cooked well and was a welcome accompaniment to our main dishes although if I'm being honest, if they hadn't served the vegetables, I wouldn't have minded as the portion sizes were more than generous.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
We were both feeling pretty full by this point but the deal included a third course so we both avoided the cherry fudge pie and opted for the lighter options.
Nicola plumped for the honey and Glayva liqueur parfait with toasted oat crumb. The parfait was smooth and creamy and well flavoured with a rich honey flavour but we both struggled to detect much Glayva. That didn't matter though as the parfait was the perfect way to end a hearty meal.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
I really fancied the cherry fudge pie but knew that there was no way that I would manage to fit it in so ordered the homemade brandy basket, duo of iced read and fruit coulis, and I'm glad that I did. The brandy snap was perfectly crisp and filled with a scoop each of Scottish tablet ice cream and saffron flavoured ice cream. Yip, I said saffron. As with most things that have had saffron added, the savoury ice cream was a deep yellow colour and a subtle floral flavour that tasted good on it's own but even better alongside the sweet tablet ice cream. I'm not the biggest lover of ice realm normally but I could have easily eaten another couple of scoops.
Gerry's Kitchen, Restaurant Review, Two Fat Ladies
By the time we had finished our desserts, the lunchtime service was almost over and it was time for us to get on our way so asked our waitress to call us a cab so that we could take the short ride back over the M8 motorway so that we could grab a few post-lunch drinks.
As I said at the start, this was one of the best value restaurant deals that I have ever bought and wouldn't hesitate in buying it again. I'm not sure that there's a better way to spend £25. In fact, now that we have eaten at Two Fat Ladies and know the quality of food that they serve, I wouldn't hesitate in going back in the future and paying full price.
So if you're looking for somewhere that serves delicious food at reasonable prices, I can't recommend Two Fat Ladies enough.
Keep up to date with Two Fat Ladies on Facebook and Twitter.